Tag Archives: Childhood’s End

My 2013 Reading List – First Six Months

I started the year with another ambitious goal of 100 books (using the Goodreads site to log and track), as last year I read 119. Through June, I’ve managed 58.

I’m grouping the books as I did in last year’s recap by the month in which I finished them (and fiction/nonfiction subgroups.) As the list is already quite long, and I’ve decided to tag all of the authors and titles, I’m publishing the first half of the year as a standalone.

Some quick stats for the BLUF (Bottom Line Up Front): heavier on the nonfiction (again) for the six months so far this year:

  • 34 nonfiction
  • 24 fiction
  • 9 of the fiction were Arthur C. Clarke novels. The last of the Big Three (Asimov and Heinlein being the other two, though Heinlein doesn’t warrant the distinction…IMO), I think he did well with science fiction and not so well with things that involve people.
  • I’ve rated 10 as five-star on Goodreads
  • I gave 2 books a one-star rating (not-only-no-but-really-no)
  • I’ve linked all of my Goodreads reviews (even if only one line) to each title, in case anyone is interested in what I thought.

And, now to the books of the first half of 2013…

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Paramedics, sports cheating, and good beer

Our son Colin graduated from paramedic school this past Thursday. As valedictorian (shameless plug from a proud parent), he was asked to give a speech to his class. He quoted part of another speech by attorney – and paramedic – David Givot. You can read the text here if you’re interested. I highly recommend it – excellent observations from one who’s been there and how being a paramedic is the most significant job there is. I’d like to share one part of the speech:

Unlike even other EMS providers, it is the paramedic who willingly puts himself or herself smack in the middle of tragedy. It is the paramedic who willingly seeks out life’s worst moments and brings hope and comfort. It is the paramedic who willingly faces the absolute worst that human kind has to offer and takes control with a level head, a firm voice, and gentle hands.

Think about that for a minute. “…willingly seeks out life’s worst moments…” It takes a special person to do that. It takes a special person to want to do that. And our Colin is one of those special people.

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