Tag Archives: Dan Pink

When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing by Daniel H. Pink

When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect TimingWhen: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing by Daniel H. Pink

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I read Dan Pink’s Drive before I read his A Whole New Mind, which was a better order because Drive was better written and had a more accurate message than Mind. Okay, a message that resonated better. When is as good as Drive, if not as much a paradigm shifter. But it is still a think prompter. Continue reading

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Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us by Daniel H. Pink – excellent

Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates UsDrive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us by Daniel H. Pink

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

You know how when you watch a movie you liked a lot a second time how maybe it wasn’t quite as funny, or as thrilling? I first read this five years ago and called it a paradigm shifter. I had to reread it for a class and there’s the “yeah, yeah, I know that already” feel.

But there’s a reason for that. When I first read this, I realized that Pink packaged what I knew innately but didn’t really know, and even if I did, probably couldn’t articulate well with the backup to support it. To say I’ve embraced Motivation 3.0 might be an understatement. I’ve vocally supported the move away from “pay for performance” (which my employer abandoned). I’ve advocated continuous feedback in lieu of annual performance appraisals, losing out on that so far. But by far the most important thing I’ve done to foster empowerment is adopt the four most important words I know. Note, this is me, not Pink, but totally in line with his premises of intrinsic rewards and supportive of autonomy, mastery and purpose.

The four words? “What Do You Think?”

I can be in a design meeting and I’ll ask that question around the table…even the architect intern taking notes. (A coworker noticed that I tend to sit next to the people who might be “lower on the totem pole”…I didn’t even realize I was doing that!) The follow on key is to listen. I will still make the decisions, but I might go in a different direction than I might have had I been alone. I’ll ask one of my staff What Do You Think…? about whatever problem arises. It’s a powerful question.

I’m not going to detail this book – others have…well, and not so well… I read a lot of management and leadership books and rare is the one that makes an impact. This did. Read it if you haven’t, and read it again if you have.

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