Tag Archives: Managing as Designing

My 2013 Reading List – First Six Months

I started the year with another ambitious goal of 100 books (using the Goodreads site to log and track), as last year I read 119. Through June, I’ve managed 58.

I’m grouping the books as I did in last year’s recap by the month in which I finished them (and fiction/nonfiction subgroups.) As the list is already quite long, and I’ve decided to tag all of the authors and titles, I’m publishing the first half of the year as a standalone.

Some quick stats for the BLUF (Bottom Line Up Front): heavier on the nonfiction (again) for the six months so far this year:

  • 34 nonfiction
  • 24 fiction
  • 9 of the fiction were Arthur C. Clarke novels. The last of the Big Three (Asimov and Heinlein being the other two, though Heinlein doesn’t warrant the distinction…IMO), I think he did well with science fiction and not so well with things that involve people.
  • I’ve rated 10 as five-star on Goodreads
  • I gave 2 books a one-star rating (not-only-no-but-really-no)
  • I’ve linked all of my Goodreads reviews (even if only one line) to each title, in case anyone is interested in what I thought.

And, now to the books of the first half of 2013…

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Simply Shocking!

English is such a trippy language. Words can mean so many things. It’s time for my spring push to prepare the pool for eventual use, and I have to shock it. So I went out in my starkers and yelled “Boo!”

Oh well. Didn’t work last year and didn’t work this morning either. Back to the old chemical methods…multiple bags of shock.

People shock us all the time. No need to explain, I’m sure.

Another shock comes when we mistake small packages for being harmless. Last night I found a tiny ant – it was black and didn’t look like a fire ant – crawling on my hand and before I brushed it off, it apparently bit me right between the knuckles of my first and second fingers. It itched for a while and when I woke up, I thought I had slept on the hand…it felt numb like that. Turns out it was swollen and the numbness was my skin being stretched. A less than three millimeter ant injected enough formic acid to cause that much of a reaction? Shocking!

There’s medical shock, impact shock, hair shock (okay, shock of hair), shocks of grain (sheaves stacked for drying) … lots of shocks. But “shock” also has the electrical connotation.

As long as I can remember, I seem to have an … (pardon) … attraction to static electricity. I don’t mean that I like or am obsessed by it. No, more like the other way around. I’m sure those who live in dry climates, or even just dry seasonal climates have experienced that spark getting out of a car. Or, walking across a room and grabbing a door handle only to receive a jarring jolt of reality that electricity is all around us. For whatever reason, my body seems to pick up more than the average person. And when it lets go… Bam!

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Public Courtesy…plus Arts, Design, and Life

I wonder how much of our best behavior that we reserve for when in public (and the accompanying corollary of less so for family) is a put on. I imagine some people do feel the need to impress strangers more than those closest to them. And I also imagine that for some, politeness either comes naturally or was beaten into them as a child. I should say, hopefully impressed upon them as a child. Public politeness manifests in interesting ways, and, as my brain tends to work occasionally, I explored an insignificant tangent last week…

Sometimes public politeness can lead to awkward situations. What do you do when someone holds the door for you? As you walk through, do you reach out to hold the door? What if he/she stills holds it? Do you not try to also hold the door open? Doors being doors in a well designed (or actually meeting accessibility building codes) facility, it’s not likely that it takes both of you to restrain it from closing. I’ve seen some contortionist-like positions assumed as people try to keep open a door – or jockey through – without touching the other person. Awkward is an understatement. Of course, you may be polite in thinking to hold a door for one, only to find yourself standing guard for the entire Ninth Royal Mountaineers. Meanwhile, your family is already seated in the theater, wondering what happened to you.

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