Tag Archives: political correctness

Correctness, political or not, is even more necessary than ever

political-correctnessSeven years ago, I had something to say about the need for political correctness. Christmas season, negative “news” fanning fake flames, mind-boggling intellectual numbness (or dearth)…at the time, I had hopes that the populace would eventually come to their senses. A couple of days ago, The Guardian ran an article, “Political correctness: how the right invented a phantom enemy“, which gave me pause to reflect on one of its theses. Could it really be one of the contributing causes to the rise of the most offensive on every level x-elects we’ve ever had? Continue reading

Public Courtesy…plus Arts, Design, and Life

I wonder how much of our best behavior that we reserve for when in public (and the accompanying corollary of less so for family) is a put on. I imagine some people do feel the need to impress strangers more than those closest to them. And I also imagine that for some, politeness either comes naturally or was beaten into them as a child. I should say, hopefully impressed upon them as a child. Public politeness manifests in interesting ways, and, as my brain tends to work occasionally, I explored an insignificant tangent last week…

Sometimes public politeness can lead to awkward situations. What do you do when someone holds the door for you? As you walk through, do you reach out to hold the door? What if he/she stills holds it? Do you not try to also hold the door open? Doors being doors in a well designed (or actually meeting accessibility building codes) facility, it’s not likely that it takes both of you to restrain it from closing. I’ve seen some contortionist-like positions assumed as people try to keep open a door – or jockey through – without touching the other person. Awkward is an understatement. Of course, you may be polite in thinking to hold a door for one, only to find yourself standing guard for the entire Ninth Royal Mountaineers. Meanwhile, your family is already seated in the theater, wondering what happened to you.

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